Latest News

 

We were glad to have tasks which were inside the shed this weekend because on Sunday afternoon it did this: 


The indoor tasks in question were: Wiring up 70013 for the TPWS & OTMR. It’s a long fiddly job and there are only a couple of people on the team with the expertise to do it, so we help mainly by keeping out of the way and occasionally supplying tea & biscuits.


Varnishing 70013, The Pakes Painting Services team have very nearly finished. They are now finishing off all the fiddly little jobs and making sure that everywhere has been painted & varnished. Cromwell is looking wonderful, I did try to get a picture but the shed doors were closed against the rain so I couldn’t get a long shot. But I daresay there will be plenty of opportunity later when she’s outside in daylight not indoors surrounded by tools and equipment.


Plus a team of us worked away on the area around the lubricators and oil pots on the running board of the Five, and I’m pleased to say that we started to make a difference.



 



For those who say that engines in the 1960s were always dirty I would reply that loco crews and photographers in those days liked to see clean engines and would make extra efforts to ‘bull up’ an engine if they had the slightest excuse – a railtour or special train, or a group of school boys visiting a shed encouraged to ‘give a hand’. Check the old films, you will soon spot footage of specials; often the commentary makes note of the fact that the photographers got together and cleaned the engine specially for the event, sometimes you can spot where the hinges of the smokebox door have been painted white because they ran out of time to polish the metal to a shine, but they wanted the effect. So let’s have clean engines – it’s what they would have wanted.


When 5305 was in traffic the 1980s she was immaculate. When we were out on the main line three years ago people commented on how clean the engine was but it was nothing to how she was in the early days. We are trying to get her back to that standard. The same is true for Sir Lamiel, despite a comment overheard at Haworth during the KWVR Gala which went “I felt it was over polished”. For those of us who work on engines we know that the less dirt there is on the engine the easier it is to spot faults and make repairs. There is something uniquely depressing about becoming black all over within minutes of starting work in a clean boiler suit which you know needs to last you for several days.

 

By Info | Monday, July 7, 2008 | Tags : 45305


Older News

January 2015

January 2014

January 2012

January 2006

January 2006

January 2006

January 2006

January 2006

January 2005

January 2005

January 2003